Fragments of Fear returns for another episode focussing on the genre’s golden period, examining Edoardo Mulargia & Gian Paolo Lomi’s Haitian set 1972 giallo Tropic of Cancer; an entry that eschews some of the more traditional trope heavy gialli of the early 1970s in favour of incorporating influences outside of it – primarily the Mondo film of the 1960s. We look at how this influence manifests throughout the film and ascertain the effectiveness of Tropic of Cancer’s Mondo like elements and depictions of Haitian culture within the structure of the giallo. We also discuss the film’s musings on sexuality, a fitting topic considering the prominent role of Swedish screen siren and giallo queen, Anita Strindberg whose career we take a look at in our discussion of the film’s players. As always, we give our insights into the film’s production history, plot mechanics and thematic ideas whilst evaluating its role in the giallo pantheon.

Here goes…

And here’s a trailer for you…

About The Author

Simon Fitzjohn

Simon is a journalism tutor in London, who also just happens to be a movie fanatic, with a craving for the darker side of cinema. He has written three books - on the horror films of director Bob Clark (2014), the history of the character Norman Bates (2015) and the work of British exploitation director Pete Walker (2017). He is currently working with director Richard Loncraine to explore all avenues in a bid to orchestrate the re-release of 1978 Mia Farrow chiller Full Circle