If Halloween 5 was the fear franchise close to coming off the tracks, Halloween 6: The Curse Of Michael Myers was the perhaps inevitable train wreck.

An absolute mess of a film, the sixth instalment is pretty notorious among genre fans for the chaotic back story to the finished product, from rewrites to reshoots, abysmal test screenings to re-edits.

We’ve got the released version, a producer’s cut, a director’s cut and even more footage floating around the net, sadly none of it making this 1995 entry anything other than a forgettable slice of nonsense.

I’ll stick with the edit that Dimension unleashed on 1995 audiences for this write-up, although I’ll probably come up with another write-up regarding the various alternate versions in a few days’ time.

Having wandered around in limbo since the 1989 episode, Halloween 6 shifts us forward a few years, with a suspiciously old looking Jamie (now played by JC Brandy) being carted through some dank corridors, seemingly in labour.

She does indeed give birth, surrounded by what appear to be druids of some type.

Anyways, these druids seem eager to get their grubby mitts on her child, so naturally Jamie decides to swipe the tot and go on the run.

Wouldn’t you know, Michael Myers seems to be shacked up with these druids, so naturally he sets off in (not so) fast pursuit.

Obviously this is all happening around Halloween, allowing Jamie to call in to a radio phone in discussing the Myers story and plead for the help of Dr Loomis.

Enter Donald Pleasance once more, who sets off for Haddonfield for another inevitable showdown with the masked one.

Joining him for the ride this time are Paul Rudd (making his big-screen debut – Clueless was filmed later, but released earlier) as Tommy Doyle (the nipper Laurie Strode was babysitting in the original), and Marianne Hagan as Kara Strode (a relative of Laurie’s adopted family).

There are plenty more minor characters this time round, seemingly serving no other purpose than to pad out the body count, with Myers carving his way through a whole lot more flesh than in previous entries.

The kills even enter the ‘inventive’ territory this time round, including Michael even managing to explode (yep, explode) one poor sap.

But what’s it all about I hear you ask? Who are these druids? Why do they want Jamie’s baby so badly? What exactly does the so-called ‘man in black’ (played here by Mitch Ryan) have to do with all this? How does Michael seemingly turn up on cue, even when the action has supposedly shifted miles away?

I wish I knew, but the truth is this original edit gives you very little in terms of answers.

Plot strands are suggested and then dumped (Tommy refers to runes at one point – then never again), characters make decisions that just don’t make any sense due to editing, and the ending – Dr Loomis announcing he has ‘unfinished business’ before a hasty cut to Myers’ mask laying on the floor (complete with a screaming Loomis on the soundtrack) is just insulting.

With all the faffing about in production and post-production, it is hard to gauge just what the end product would have been if director Joe Chappelle and writer Daniel Farrands had been allowed to simply get on with it, as even the producer’s cut supposedly suffers from interference.

Let’s face it, no one truly expects the sixth entry in a horror series to be much cop, but Halloween 6: The Curse Of Michael Myers is a real balls-up of a movie.

Amazingly, it is not even the worst in the series (step forward Halloween: Resurrection), but this is not far off – for completists only.

About The Author

Simon Fitzjohn

Simon is a journalism tutor in London, who also just happens to be a movie fanatic, with a craving for the darker side of cinema. He has written two books, one on the horror films of director Bob Clark (2014) and the other on the history of the character Norman Bates (2015). His third book, on the work of British exploitation director Pete Walker, is due in 2017.