Had you told me that after seeing The Fast and The Furious, that it would go on to spawn several successful sequels, I would’ve probably laughed in your face.

It’s not that it was a bad film, but it struck me as a one off – Point Break with fast cars.  And when the first sequels came out with major characters missing, I didn’t give the series much regard and I assumed it would wither away and die in very much the same fashion as that other Vin Diesel vehicle, xXx.

But all the cast did come back for the fourth instalment and we’re now up to the sixth film this series and if the mid-credit sequence is anything to go by, we’re set for a seventh instalment too.

Fast and Furious 6 picks up about 6 months after the events of Fast 5, with our cast of characters all happily shacked up with their millions, having babies and living life to the full without any risk of extradition.

With Brian O’Conner (Paul Walker) and Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) happily living the family life uninterrupted by the authorities, the 3rd part of the bromance-love-triangle, the uber buff DSS agent Luke Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) turns up with some information regarding Lettie (Michelle Rodriguez) – a character previously thought dead and once upon several previous films ago was Dom’s love interest.

Naturally, this brings the old gang back together for one more heist and in return for helping out the DSS, they will get their names cleared and will be able to return home.

Lette (Michelle Rodriguez) isn't dead yet

Lette (Michelle Rodriguez) isn’t dead yet

With each Fast and Furious flick, there’s usually another excuse to go to some exotic location and this instalment is no different, with most of the action taking place in London (ok, not that exotic).

Speaking as a Londoner, if this was set in the real world we all know the street races here usually consist of 18 year old boys who think they’re the next Jeremy Clarkson, in their jumped up Fiat Puntos, Nissan Micras and Vauxhall Corsas.

But in Hollywood, the street race movement is full of cockney geezers that say “gore blimey guv’ner” and scantily clad ladies dancing provocatively while not giving a monkeys about the cold British weather. It’s all probably for the best really, because had they not taken a bit of artistic licence Fast and Furious 6 would’ve probably come off as a special Hollywood guest episode of The Bill.

As mentioned earlier, all the gang from the previous film are present and correct, while newcomers to the series include Haywire’s Gina Carano- who might not say much but has some very memorable and impressive fights and The Raid’s Joe Taslim who also has the chance to show off some of those martial art skills.

Luke Evans is the main villain Owen Shaw, an ex-SAS agent turned criminal, but sadly he is somewhat underused as his plot to steal military hardware or something is so convoluted and confusing amongst the mayhem, it’s never clearly explained. He is bad, that’s all you need to know I guess.

Speaking of the mayhem, this is easily the films finest feature – those fearing that Fast and Furious 6 would not be able to out do the ridiculous set-pieces of the previous instalment need not worry. Tanks, automobiles and aeroplanes are all involved in the insane stunts, and with the action ramped up several notches it pretty much borders on self parody.

They even manage to find a bigger and badder burley bastard than Dwayne Johnson for Luke Hobbs to square off against during a tag team duo fight also featuring Vin Diesel. Very manly stuff.


It’s all actually quite enjoyable and the ridiculous corny script does wonders for the film’s charm.

Essentially, with this sixth instalment The Fast and The Furious has become the soap opera of action movies. Enjoyable, but absolutely unbelievable and completely aware of itself – in other words it’s pure cinematic escapism.

Think Dallas with powerful cars, amnesia and bromance.

Verdict:
[rating=3]

About The Author

Colin lives in south west London. Looks like a hobbit and has been watching films ever since he saw Return of the Jedi at the age of 3. You can follow Colin on Twitter @obicolkenobi.