Proving the theory that you do not have to come up with something earth-shatteringly original to hit the spot, The Other Side is a frenetic and brutal piece of work.

Clocking in at a breakneck 20 minutes, the flick is part slasher movie and part home invasion opus, with a baby in peril thrown in for good measure.

Directed with real panache by the Santoro Brothers, this is a pretty impressive calling card that should hopefully lead to bigger and better things.

Set in the rural English countryside, we are introduced to the three main players straight from the off – wife Rachel (Amelia Warner), potential nanny Sophie (Jennie Jacques) and husband James (Nick Moran).

For whatever reason James seems pretty miffed that his missus has decided to bring in a nanny, but things are smoothed over when Sophie is shown to her room.

Later that night though all hell breaks loose when James’ van is found deserted, but with its lights on, outside the house and before you can blink we have a hulking killer laying waste to everything in his path.

Suddenly it is a desperate battle for survival for all concerned, including a pair of policemen, as they look to escape the clutches of this brutal behemoth.

As stated in the opening paragraph, there is nothing here that will particularly have you raising any eyebrows in surprise.

But the whole thing is put together so well, and so frantically paced, that you barely have time to draw breath.

The whole thing looks sensational, with production values that deserve to be seen on the biggest screen.

The performances are solid and while the gore is minimal, the short is positively dripping with menace.

Better keep an eye on these Santoro Brothers……

About The Author

Simon Fitzjohn

Simon is a journalism tutor in London, who also just happens to be a movie fanatic, with a craving for the darker side of cinema. He has written two books, one on the horror films of director Bob Clark (2014) and the other on the history of the character Norman Bates (2015). His third book, on the work of British exploitation director Pete Walker, is due in 2017.